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Louth
Louth
Louth
Louth
Louth

Louth Gardens

Gardens & Parks in Louth.

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Beaulieu House, Garden & Car Museum Louth

Beaulieu House, Garden & Car Museum Situated North of Dublin, on the banks of the river Boyne, between the town of Drogheda and the Irish sea, Beaulieu House was built by Sir Henry Tichbourne then Marshall of the Army in Ireland and Governor General of Drogheda at the time of the restoration of Charles II. The Plunkett family previously owned the lands of Beaulieu and its castle. Likewise there exists a vivid description of the progress with the garden, thought to be designed by Dutch Artist Van de Hagen who must have stayed some time at Beaulieu, painting the picture over the Hall fireplace, the Drawing Room ceiling and possibly using the garden as base to teach horticultural students in the art of designing the typical future Irish walled garden. The Church was rebuilt about 1830, there having been a church in the grounds certainly since the Plunkett family owned the Estate. Gabriel DeFreitas of Beaulieu House has a very established career in motor racing under the name of Gabriel Konig. Achievements in the late sixties and early seventies rank her in the top two Irish lady drivers. Now returned to live at her native Beaulieu Gabriel has assembled a collection of Historic Classic racing and rally saloons to form the main stay of the new car museum - open to the public as part of the house tour options.

Knockabbey Castle & Gardens - Tallanstown, Co Louth

Knockabbey Castle & Gardens - Tallanstown, Co Louth reflect the constantly changing fortunes of its owners for more than six centuries. The numerous additions and changes evident in the castle and gardens are like different chapters in a book; all telling different stories about different periods and people. When it was first built in 1399, it was called Thomastown Castle and consisted only of a simple square building; the tower house where the interpretative centre is now housed. This structure offered its owners, the Bellews, comfort and security at a time when skirmishes between the native Irish and the New English and Norman settlers were quite common.

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